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Award winning musical experiences for children aged 4-11

#MusicMondays – Recommended Listening – Halloween Edition

We’re super excited to announce our new #MusicMondays!

Every Monday we will be sharing with you our Recommended Listening – 5 tracks that we love at our Head Office and each one aiming to inspire you and your child.

As it’s Halloween coming up we’ve come up with a few “‘spooktakular” pieces to get you in the mood. To make it easy for you to find these pieces, we have added links to Youtube and Spotify too alongside a few fun facts too!

1) Toccata and Fugue in d minor, J.S. Bach

Bach’s Toccata and Fugue is one of the most well-known pieces of music associated with Halloween. This spooky organ piece fits in perfectly with the season with its creepy sounds, imitating the sound of creaking boards and ghosts.

Listen to Toccata and Fugue on YouTube or Spotify.

2) Piano Sonata No.2: III. ‘Funeral March’, Frederic Chopin

Chopin’s iconic ‘Funeral March’ which appeared in the 1830s as the third movement in his Piano Sonata No. 2 was first performed at Chopin’s own funeral. The work imitates the solemn pace of a funeral procession – an exceptionally beautiful yet haunting piece.

Listen to Piano Sonata No.2 on YouTube or Spotify.

3) Symphonie fantastique: Fifth movement, Hector Berlioz

‘The Dream of a Witches’ Sabbath’ is the fifth movement from Berlioz’s Symphonie fantastique. It depicts the scene of demons and sorcerers gathered to celebrate the Sabbath night. Listen closely – Can you hear the bells ringing towards the middle of the piece?

Listen to Symphonie fantastique on YouTube or Spotify.

4) Danse Macabre, Saint Saëns

According to Classic FM, this is the spookiest piece of music ever written! This has to take the crown for the most truly terrifying piece of classical music. The dark little dance emulates Death, who makes the dead rise from their graves on Halloween and dance to the sinister tune on his violin. *shudders*

Listen to an amazing child-friendly video created by Classic FM here

5) The Skeleton Dance, Disney 

‘The Skeleton Dance’ comes from a 1929 Disney short film called Silly Symphony, and it’s a perfect example of classical music at its most creative. The light-hearted music scores the dancing skeletons’ movements with various percussion instruments – and one of the skeletons themselves even gets used as a glockenspiel.

Listen to an amazing child-friendly video created by Classic FM here 

What next?

If you would like to help to inspire your child through music why not join us at one of our multi award-winning Holiday Camps near you? Click below to find your nearest Holiday Camp.

Want us to come to our area? Join The Strings Club family and run your own multi award-winning Holiday Camps. Find more info here or give us a call.

Find your nearest Holiday Camp here